4 Important Things 2014 Has Taught Me

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As 2014 is nearly over and a new year is upon us, I thought it would be really nice to reflect back on the things I personally learned in 2014.

If you don’t ask, you don’t get

Honestly, you cannot even imagine how many opportunities have arisen for me because of simply just opening my mouth and asking. This year, I did not wait for things to happen to me, I chased them. Of course I feared rejection, but you need rejection to happen in order for you to grow. Do not wait for things to happen, go out there and make them happen. Be proactive. You never know what is round the corner.

Everything is actually going to be alright

We all have hardships in our lives and this year has taught me that, even if you are going through a tough time, it won’t be forever. I used to be so negative and thought I will always be in those dark days forever, but it doesn’t have to be. I appreciate the little things in my life. Everything is going be alright.

Taking ‘selfies’ is not narcissistic

For years, I hated the way I looked and was ashamed to be in photos but selfies became a ‘thing’ in 2014 and I relished that. It actually taught me to be happy with the way I look. I don’t need cosmetic surgery after all. My face is fine. Why has society taught us to hate the way we look?

Just say yes

I used to be afraid of saying yes to things because I feared it. I realised that if you don’t try something, you will never know what it will be like. You might surprise yourself. Say yes to more opportunities (sensible ones of course), even if you are weary about it. Try it and if you don’t like it – you don’t have to do it again.

Happy New Year!!

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Should Mental Health Lessons Be Taught In Schools?

There are calls for young people to be taught about mental health in schools as part of the national curriculum after a study revealed today that one in three children in Britain have contemplated suicide by the age of 16.

The reason for this is a lack of education surrounding mental health as many young people go without help and therefore struggle to cope. There are issues in schools that young people face everyday such as bullying and schools often do not take into consideration the result of bullying and how severely it can effect a person, espcially when they at an age where they are trying to find their own identify. They could resort to self harm, eating disorders and have low self-esteem.

There could be a shy and quiet pupil in a classroom and perhaps they are naturally shy but it could be more to it than that. That person could be depressed and suicidal because he or she is being bullied and does not know where or who to turn to. If that person was taught about mental health in school, then they could at least know that they could have a problem and know where to go for help.

There is still a stigma attached to having a mental health problem and people are still quite weary of even talking about it.

Having been through my school years but not once was I ever taught about depression or anxiety disorders or even eating disorders. I do believe if I was taught about those issues, maybe I could have handled them well and perhaps know what to do and feel less alone.

Early intervention is key to any illness and a mental disorder is something like cancer. If it is not treated early, then it will grow and grow and keep on growing until it eventually gets worse.

I strongly believe lessons on mental health will benefit young people in a positive way. However, mental illness is not a choice so having lessons on mental health will not prevent them developing a problem but they will get to understand it and break the stigma attached to it. They will talk about it and know who to go to for help if they unfortunately develop one. Schools need to start preparing students for real life and real problems because frankly that is where the problem lies – there is lack of education out there.